1.8 million immigration applications are waiting to be processed

About 1.8 million immigration applications are waiting to be processed

The Canadian news agency, CBC, recently obtained information from IRCC showing that Canada had a backlog of nearly 1.8 million immigration applications as of Oct. 27. The applications are in the following categories:

  • 548,195 permanent residence applications, including 112,392 refugee applications.
  • 775,741 temporary residence applications (study permits, work permits, temporary resident visas and visitor extensions).
  • and 468,000 Canadian citizenship applications.

According to a report released by the Information Commissioner of Canada, IRCC also received 116,928 access requests in the 2019-20 fiscal year, which is a 42% increase over the previous period. Moreover, the majority of those requests (98.9%) were about immigration application files.

In an email to CBC, IRCC explained the delays and said it is improving the technology of its operations.

“Ongoing international travel restrictions, border restrictions, limited operational capacity overseas and the inability on the part of clients to obtain documentation due to the effects of COVID-19 have created barriers within the processing continuum. This hinders IRCC’s ability to finalize applications, creating delays that are outside IRCC’s control,” said the department in its statement. It added “We continue to work as hard as possible to reduce processing times.”

Note: The above is a summary of the CBC post, which you can read in full on their website.

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