New year’s immigration resolution by Al Parsai – 2022 edition

New year’s resolutions help us plan for the next twelve months. I genuinely like to be spontaneous. However, when it comes to serving my clients, planning is the name of the game. So let’s take a look at my new year’s immigration resolution.

Who is making this new year’s immigration resolution?

I am Al Parsai, a 50-year-old Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (RCIC). I have been an active, licenced practitioner for the past 11 years. Nevertheless, here are some of my other credentials and achievements.

  • Holding a master’s degree in law from the prestigious York University (LLM in Dispute Resolution)
  • Representing thousands of applicants from more than 50 countries
  • A recently appointed adjunct professor at Queen’s University (the law department) for teaching immigration courses
  • Teaching immigration courses at Ashton College since 2016
  • Being the author of “88 Tips on Immigration to Canada,” a well-known 307-page book in the field of immigration to Canada
  • Running a successful immigration consulting business in downtown Toronto
  • Holding a second master’s degree (Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology) which helps me be a passionate practitioner
  • Delivering several speeches and training sessions for settlement organizations and other entities
  • Publishing hundreds of posts and videos about immigration to Canada

Of course, you may google my name, Al Parsai, for more information.

(1) Taking care of my existing clients

Thanks to the immense backlogs, I have many pending applications. As a new year’s immigration resolution, I promise all my existing clients to take care of them, by

  • Proactively being an advocate for them
  • Responding to their queries as quickly and as comprehensively as possible
  • Taking care of IRCC, CBSA, and IRB requests in a timely fashion
  • Educating my clients about the immigration system in Canada

Of course, I’ll do my best to assist my clients in understanding what’s going on and help them go through the process as smoothly as possible. Nonetheless, I know that adverse decisions have psychological and financial consequences for my clients. Therefore, I’ll do my best to be with them through thick and thin.

(2) A new year’s immigration resolution for new clients

Every practitioner loves to have new clients. I’m no exception. However, I’ll do my best to sign a service agreement with only those who I believe I can serve competently. I cannot guarantee success. Both my clients and I know that the decision-maker is someone else. Nonetheless, I can remain professional and be a phenomenal liaison for them.

(3) Serving the public

My new year’s immigration resolution for the people is the gift of education. I’ll continue creating and publishing educational material. Of course, I’ll do so on a variety of media, such as

By spreading correct information, they will hopefully make the right decisions. Moreover, they can identify scammers and stay away from them.

The last words about my new year’s immigration resolution

I hope you understand that this post is not a legal document. Therefore, you cannot hold me responsible for its contents. However, it shows how I see 2022 as an active practitioner. Moreover, the world of immigration fluctuates more than cryptocurrencies. Consequently, I’ll adapt myself to every peak and trough. Book a consultation session with me if you wish to engage my services. Of course, I also offer mentorship sessions for other practitioners. Alternatively, for all different situations, please fill out our assessment form.

Read this in Spanish 

Related Posts

Canada passport

Canada ranked 7th in most powerful passport of the world

Jan 17, 2022

Can you travel to Canada with a missing or expired PR card?

Jan 16, 2022
provinces employment rates

These are the provinces that lead in employment growth in Canada

Jan 16, 2022
PNP Draws 2022

Ontario, Saskatchewan and BC held their first PNP draws of 2022

Jan 15, 2022

Would you please fill out our free assessment form if you wish to visit or move to Canada? We will review it for free, but we will contact you only if we find an opportunity for you. Alternatively, you may book a consultation session. Consultation sessions are not free, but you will receive formal immigration advice from a licensed practitioner.

Al Parsai, LLM, MA, DTM, RCIC
Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant
Adjunct Professor – Queen’s University – Faculty of Law
Ashton College Instructor – Immigration Consulting
Author – 88 Tips on Immigration to Canada

Fill our Free Canada Immigration Assessment Form in your language!

Disclaimer:
This article provides information of a general nature only. Considering the fluid nature of the immigration world, it may no longer be current. Of course, the item does not give legal advice. Therefore, do not rely on it as legal advice or immigration advice. Consequently, no one could hold us accountable for the content of these articles. Of course, if you have specific legal questions, you must consult a lawyer. Alternatively, if you are looking for immigration advice, book an appointment.

The characters and places in the articles:
All the characters and locations in the articles are fictional, unless otherwise clearly stated. Therefore, any resemblance in names, dates, and places is coincidental.

Important Notes:
For our official addresses, trust this website only. We currently do not have offices outside Canada. Therefore, anyone who claims to be our agent is committing fraud. Also, note that we do not issue any work permits or study permits or similar documents. The government of Canada has the sole authority to issue such material.

Click to read the disclaimer.

Al Parsai

Al Parsai is a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (RCIC) in Toronto, Canada. He also teaches immigration courses at Ashton College in Vancouver, Canada. Al, who holds a Master of Laws (LLM) degree from York University, is a member of ICCRC and CAPIC organizations. Al, the CEO of Parsai Immigration Services, has represented thousands of applicants from more than 50 countries to the immigration authorities since January 2011.

Do you have any questions?