Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) – Alternative Immigration to Canada

The Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) is a Canadian immigration scheme that is based on contracts between most provinces and the federal government of Canada. According to section 95 of the Canadian Constitution Act 1867, provinces are permitted to take care of their immigration matters assuming their laws are not repugnant to the federal immigration laws and regulations. Consequently, most Canadian provinces and territories have signed agreements with the federal government in order to attract immigrants to their own provinces. In general, the province attracts, finds, and nominates immigrants. Then they refer approved candidates to federal immigration authorities in order to issue permanent resident visas.

Every year, many skilled worker, graduates and entrepreneurs come to call Canada home when a province nominates them because of the skills and/or capital they can bring to this country.

PNP mostly looks for skilled workers from all different backgrounds that have experience as well as education at a college or university. The Provincial Nominee Program also targets investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons, who can bring fresh eyes and new innovations to Canada. This helps create a more powerful and strong economy, benefiting other Canadians. Many provinces also run programs that help families reunite in their provinces.

When you are a skilled worker or an entrepreneur who has the experience and education, and the province approves you, it is very likely that you would receive the final approval from the federal immigration authorities. However, read the rest of this article before you take action.

Research

First and foremost, research all the provinces and territories that are in the program (which is every province and territory, except for Quebec and Nunavut). Quebec runs its own immigration program which is more geared toward French-speaking immigrants. All provinces need different types of workers so researching all of the provinces is important. If you find a program that suits your qualifications and/or needs then you may apply. Consider visiting the following links:

After Being Accepted by the Province

After you have been accepted into a provincial nominee program, applying to IRCC for the purpose of becoming a Permanent Resident is normally easy. However, IRCC my refuse issuing visas because of inadmissibility or misrepresentation. They may also refuse the application if the officers doubts the applicant may economically establish themselves in Canada.

If you wish to visit or move to Canada or if you have encountered any issues with the immigration authorities, you may fill out our free assessment form or book a consultation session to assess your potential opportunities or offer you immigration, visa, or citizenship advice.

Al Parsai, MA, DTM, RCIC
Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant
Ashton College Instructor – Immigration Consulting

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Disclaimer:
“This article provides information of a general nature only. It may no longer be current. It does not provide legal advice nor should it be relied upon. If you have specific legal questions you should consult a lawyer. If you are looking for official immigration advice contact us.”

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Al Parsai, MA, DTM, RCIC
Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant
Ashton College Instructor – Immigration Consulting
Author – 88 Tips on Immigration to Canada

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Disclaimer:
This article provides information of a general nature only. Considering the fluid nature of the immigration world, it may no longer be current. Of course, the item does not give legal advice. Therefore, do not rely on it as legal advice or immigration advice. Consequently, no one could hold us accountable for the content of these articles. Of course, if you have specific legal questions, you must consult a lawyer. Alternatively, if you are looking for immigration advice, book an appointment.

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Al Parsai

This article has been expertly crafted by Al Parsai, a distinguished Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (L3 RCIC-IRB – Unrestricted Practice) hailing from vibrant Toronto, Canada. Al's academic achievements include an esteemed role as an adjunct professor at prestigious Queen's University Law School and Ashton College, as well as a Master of Laws (LLM) degree from York University. A respected member of CICC and CAPIC organizations, Al's insights are further enriched by his experience as the dynamic CEO of Parsai Immigration Services. Guiding thousands of applicants from over 55 countries through the immigration process since 2011, Al's articles offer a wealth of invaluable knowledge for readers.