Work experience for CEC v. FSW under the Express Entry

One of my Queen’s University students recently asked me about work experience requirements for CEC v. FSW under the Express Entry system in Canada. While answering the question, I realized that this topic appeared easy to grasp but not so much in reality. Therefore, thanks to this intriguing question from an intelligent knowledge-seeker, I decided to write this short piece.

Work experience requirements for CEC (Canadian Experience Class)

Paragraphs 87.1(2)(a), (b), and (c) of IRPR describe the minimum work experience requirements for CEC. Furthermore, the IRCC website explains how the officers evaluate this matter. Namely,

  • You need at least one year of full-time work experience in Canada in the past three years. However, consider the following:
    • The job must fall under NOC 0, A, or B. Moreover, it must match the lead statement and the majority of the main duties of the NOC description.
    • If you do not work full-time, then you must accumulate the equivalent of one year or at least 1,560 hours via part-time work
    • It is okay if you have employment gaps as long as you meet all the requirements
  • When working in Canada, you must hold valid temporary status
  • You must show that you worked when you had the authorization to work in Canada
  • IRCC does not accept the following work experiences as in-Canada for CEC:
    • Volunteer or unpaid work
    • Unpaid co-op or internship
    • Self-employed work
    • Work experience while being a full-time student
  • IRCC does not accept the following situations for CEC applications:
    • Being a refugee claimant
    • Working without authorization or a valid temporary status
  • If you work beyond 30 hours a week, you may not use it to cover the minimum of 1,560 hours. Consequently, you need to work for at least one year even if you work more than 30 hours per week.

Work experience requirements for FSW (Federal Skilled Worker Class)

Paragraphs 75(2)(a), (b), and (c) of IRPR describe the minimum work experience requirements for the FSW program. Furthermore, the IRCC website explains how the officers evaluate this matter. Namely,

  • You need at least one year of full-time work experience inside or outside Canada in the past ten years. However, consider the following:
    • The job must fall under NOC 0, A, or B. Moreover, it must match the lead statement and the majority of the main duties of the NOC description.
    • If you do not work full-time, you must accumulate the equivalent of one year or at least 1,560 hours via part-time work.
    • The minimum work experience must fall under the same NOC code. Also, it may not have any gaps (i.e., for the one year full-time or the equivalent part-time).
  • The NOC code that you report for the minimum work experience must match the NOC code of your intended work in Canada.
  • You must have earned money via salary or commission. Consequently, officers do not accept unpaid work experience.
  • You may consider work while studying. However, consider the following:
    • The job must be continuous with no gaps.
    • You may only take paid jobs into account (salary or commission).
    • The work must meet all the requirements of the FSW program.
    • If the job is in Canada, the Express Entry system may not allow you to report it. If you do, it could disqualify you because you reported work experience in Canada as a student. Of course, this is a technical glitch, but as long as IRCC has not resolved it, you must remain conscious of this problem.

A table that compares minimum work experience for CEC and FSW

The following table is an effort to compare the minimum work experience for CEC and FSW.

FactorCECFSW
NOC level or type0, A, B0, A, B
LocationInside CanadaInside or outside Canada
How far in the past?In the past three years from the date of applying.In the past ten years from the date of applying.
GapsOkayNot okay
Self-employed job or working while a full-time studentNot okayOkay
Volunteer or unpaid workNot okayNot okay
A table that compares work experience for CEC v. FSW

This table makes comparing work experience requirements for these two immigration options easier. However, make sure to study the previous sections of this article for the details.

Working more than the minimum work experience requirements for CEC or FSW

Both CEC and FSW fall under the Express Entry system. This system uses a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) to assign points to each applicant. Of course, having more CRS points enhances your chances of receiving an Invitation to Apply (ITA). You may receive extra CRS points if you work more than the minimum requirements. If you are not familiar with the CRS points or the Express Entry process, please read the following articles:

The CRS considers your work experience in the past ten years. You could receive extra points for up to five years of Canadian work experience and up to three years of foreign work experience. Furthermore, under the FSW selection grid, you may receive extra points for up to six years of work experience inside or outside Canada (see R80). However, consider only paid NOC 0, A, or B jobs.

NOTE: IRCC will soon switch to the TEER system for NOC.

Mentorship sessions

Whether your concern is the work experience requirements for CEC or FSW, or you have other questions, you may book one or more mentorship sessions with me. However, my mentorship sessions are only for licensed practitioners. If you are an applicant, please book a consultation session with me or fill out our assessment form.

Read this in Spanish

Related Posts

Ontario candidates invited

Ontario held a major draw: 1,179 candidates invited

Oct 1, 2022
Immigrate to British Columbia after graduation International Students

Immigrate to British Columbia after graduation – International Students

Sep 30, 2022
New Amendments for Temporary Foreign Workers are Now in Force

New Amendments for Temporary Foreign Workers are Now in Force

Sep 29, 2022
New Express Entry Draw

New Express Entry Draw: 3,750 candidates invited – CRS score 504

Sep 28, 2022

Would you please fill out our free assessment form if you wish to visit or move to Canada? We will review it for free, but we will contact you only if we find an opportunity for you. Alternatively, you may book a consultation session. Consultation sessions are not free, but you will receive formal immigration advice from a licensed practitioner.

Al ParsaiAl Parsai, LLM, MA, RCIC-IRB
Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant
Adjunct Professor – Queen’s University – Faculty of Law
Ashton College Instructor – Immigration Consulting
Author – 88 Tips on Immigration to Canada

Fill our Free Canada Immigration Assessment Form in your language!

Disclaimer:
This article provides information of a general nature only. Considering the fluid nature of the immigration world, it may no longer be current. Of course, the item does not give legal advice. Therefore, do not rely on it as legal advice or immigration advice. Consequently, no one could hold us accountable for the content of these articles. Of course, if you have specific legal questions, you must consult a lawyer. Alternatively, if you are looking for immigration advice, book an appointment.

The characters and places in the articles:
All the characters and locations in the articles are fictional, unless otherwise clearly stated. Therefore, any resemblance in names, dates, and places is coincidental.

Important Notes:
For our official addresses, trust this website only. We currently do not have offices outside Canada. Therefore, anyone who claims to be our agent is committing fraud. Also, note that we do not issue any work permits or study permits or similar documents. The government of Canada has the sole authority to issue such material.

Click to read the disclaimer.

Al Parsai

Al Parsai is a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (class L3 RCIC-IRB – Unrestricted Practice) in Toronto, Canada. He is an adjunct professor at Queen's University Law School and Ashton College. Al, who holds a Master of Laws (LLM) degree from York University, is a member of CICC and CAPIC organizations. Al, the CEO of Parsai Immigration Services, has represented thousands of applicants from more than 50 countries to the immigration authorities since January 2011.

Do you have any questions?